‘Testimony’ by Fiona Larkin

  Testimony after Alberto Giacometti stark figurine you are here to unpick with your needle-bright point our distinguishing features the whorl of a curl the curve of a lip mother or teacher or classmate flatten to form bare outline as collars wear thin as beads fall unstrung flesh drops away the wolf called attrition called hatred called hunger consumes to the bone a stipple of … Continue reading ‘Testimony’ by Fiona Larkin

from ‘One Hundred Lockdown Sonnets’ by Jacqueline Saphra

  XLI 2nd May ‘Death Map. Interactive coronavirus map lets you find out number of deaths in your postcode.’ The Sun And suddenly it’s fear. He wakes me up at odd hours, pulls me out of bed, he works by stealth, he spikes my morning cup with dark. I drink him like a drug, I dread his silences. Fear speaks in chokes. He knows no … Continue reading from ‘One Hundred Lockdown Sonnets’ by Jacqueline Saphra

‘Tiger in the National Gallery’ by Susan Utting

Tiger in the National Gallery after Henri Rousseau’s “Surprised!” Why surprised? – I’m everywhere: I’m tapestry and marquetry, and Paris hothouse fantasy. I am pelt and roar beneath a rich man’s silk-shod feet, I shoulder-shrug a wealthy woman’s back, clotheshorses catwalk me; glass cases keep me cool and pristine, poems fete me, legends spin me, taxidermy gives me life eternal. And here I am among … Continue reading ‘Tiger in the National Gallery’ by Susan Utting

Two Poems by Elisabeth Sennitt Clough

  Potholes Every village has them. Some appear overnight and none of them have spray-painted signs or battered warning triangles next to them. Though their ambitions are shallow, some potholes leave openings wide enough to swallow you. You try to ignore them, but they pull you in and though at first you call out, your cries for help can go the length of a village … Continue reading Two Poems by Elisabeth Sennitt Clough

‘Teaching Tabitha to Knit’ by Carole Bromley

  See, I haven’t done this for years. Take one knitting needle in each hand. No, hold it nearer the end, that’s it. Now wind the yarn round that one. Hang on, I’ll give you a hand. OK, now kind of make a loop, see? Try tucking one needle under your arm. In over through off. It’s like a poem! A really messy one with … Continue reading ‘Teaching Tabitha to Knit’ by Carole Bromley